New Book Review: Lady Midnight by Cassandra Clare



Hey Bibliophiles!

I’m super excited to present today’s book review, which is brought to you in association with LoveReading UK, the largest book recommendations website in the U.K. Make sure you check them out at; www.lovereading.co.uk

Also a BIG thank you to the publishers, Simon&Schuster for sending this book to me!

Lady Midnight is the first book in The Dark Artifices trilogy which was published in 2016.

Synopsis: Lady Midnight is an epic fantasy novel that follows the story of Emma and Julian who are highly trained, demon-slaying Shadowhunters. As parabatai, they also share a magical bond, which amplifies their angelic powers in battle. But to be parabatai means to be bound to one another for life, forbidden from falling in love with one another.

When a series of mysterious murders occur across L.A. Emma and Julian, together with Julian’s family investigate these strange events that all linked and rooted in dark magic. Even if it means risking their lives, they are determined to solve this mystery as it leads them to the answers behind their tragic past.

Lady Midnight is the first book in The Dark Artifices trilogy which was published in 2016. If you’ve read Clare’s previous Shadowhunter books, most notably The Mortal Instruments Series, which was also adapted for film, you’ll love reading this book. Clare creates an immersive, supernatural world that is a boon of escapism.

Click here to read the full review!

Interlude In Kosovo by Robert Hedley

Interlude In Kosovo is the second novel written by former doctor turned author, Robert Hedley. It was published in 2018 by Michael Terence Publishing.

Synopsis: ” Dr. Claire Peters flees her unfaithful husband, James, to work for The World Health Organisation in post-war Kosovo. Her husband follows, hoping for reconciliation. 
Both take lovers, she a French Captain in KFOR (Kosovo Force), part of UNMIK (United Nations Mission in Kosovo) he a beautiful Kosovar, wife of a senior member of the KLA (Kosova Liberation Army), catapulting both into a mix of Kosovo politics and criminality…” (an overview by goodreads).

Firstly, I would like to thank the author for gifting this book to me in exchange for my review!

I was immediately drawn to the title of this book as one who has essentially grown up in an environment where I was surrounded by Kosovans and Albanians, particularly during my school years, when there was a sharp increase in the number of migrant Kosovans to London in the aftermath of the war. Many of my schoolmates were Kosovan yet I knew little to nothing about the political unrest in their country and had the vaguest knowledge of a war that ravaged their land so when Robert asked me to review this book, I was very much eager to do so.

The writing in this novel is flawless; it sets the scene perfectly and the plot progresses at a comfortable speed that eases the reader into the story before the pacing suddenly picks up towards the end.

Interlude In Kosovo is the second novel written by former doctor turned author, Robert Hedley. It was published in 2018 by Michael Terence Publishing.

The story is loosely based on Hedley’s own experiences, also working for the World Health Organization in Kosovo during the post-war period, therefore there is a strong medical presence in this novel, however this didn’t detract from the book’s other core themes of political uncertainty, destitution, criminality and infidelity.

I particularly enjoyed the arc surrounding one of the ethnic Albanian characters, where the story conveyed an air of mystery and villainy, the development of which I found to be extremely multi-layered and made me sympathize with their character.

However, I was mostly underwhelmed by the development of the main characters; Claire and James, particularly the latter, not because of his lack of his restraint, or the fact that women seem to want to take their clothes off when there’re around him, but because of the bad decisions he constantly makes throughout the novel which made it difficult for me to empathize with his character.

I also wasn’t keen on the ending which felt a bit too sudden and rushed. The pacing of the novel picked up towards the end which I loved as it built suspense but it also meant that some of the mystery was handled with only cursory detail and therefore left underdeveloped. I was overall satisfied with how it ended but not so much on its execution.

Interlude In Kosovo was nonetheless an extremely enjoyable and insightful read that I would easily recommend. I would definitely read this book again purely for the enjoyment value and not as a critic as I love the story-telling and the light it sheds on the history and culture of Kosovo as well as the cataclysmic effects of oppression at the hands of a Serbian dictator.

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My 2018 In Books – Please Vote!

Last year was a year like any other. Full of highs and rife with lows. I experienced my fair share of both in equal measure despite how generic that sounds. Among other things, I’m so glad that I finally started this blog after years of procrastination and self-doubt. Don’t get me wrong, I’m still trying to figure this stuff out as sometimes I really feel so out of my depth. Nevertheless, its thanks to this little blog of mine that I have been able to read 50 books this year which I am extremely thrilled about!

c But those books which stood above the rest and affected me the most are those which I am going to share with you today. Here are my Top 5 books of 2018!

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Silent Companions by Laura Purcell “…This insidiously gothic horror story which I’ve been gushing over on various social media platforms, gripped me from the outset to the ingeniously sinister end.” ⭐⭐⭐⭐

This Is Going To Hurt by Adam Kay “… This book is without doubt unquestionably funny. Even at times when it shouldn’t be, the occasional tone of cynicism turns an otherwise dire situation into a witty anecdote.”⭐⭐⭐⭐

A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini “… the writing style is flawless with imagery that is both scenic and vibrant. I loved reading his descriptions of Herat when Mariam first ventured there.” ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Wonder Valley by Ivy Pochoda “… the writing is atmospheric, placing you in the scene so vividly as though you were running alongside Tony on his morning jog, or walking alongside Sam and Blake in the oppressive heat of the desert.”⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata “… the way it injected an almost unopened newness into the banality of being a store worker through Keiko’s unusual perspective was perfection.” ⭐⭐⭐⭐


These were utterly brilliant books which I greatly enjoyed reading. They lingered on in my thoughts well after I had finished reading them. They opened my eyes in some way and changed my outlook and I can’t wait to read each one of them again. Please click on the titles above to read my reviews! If you’ve read any of these books, please tell me your thoughts about it in the comments 🙂 📚

⬇️ Now I want to hear from you fellow readers!


⬇️ Vote for your fave book of 2018 here!

Thank you so much for your support in 2018 and for your feedback! Have a fantastic 2019 you bibliophiles! And to keep updated with my upcoming reviews, please visit the Book Reviews page 🙂

Xx.

Such Is Love by Petra Hassall

Such Is Love is a self-help book written by London based psychotherapist and writer Petra Hassall. It was published in 2018 by Troubador Publishing. This book is a fantastic read for anyone interested in the human psche and how it plays out in our intimate relationships, however it is specifically geared at those who are looking for the key to finding a successful relationship.

Such Is Love is written in an accessible and structured way that is easy to connect with. It debunks psychoanalytical jargon such as Displacement Theory and Transactional Analysis and applies such terms practically to situations we can all identify with, if not having experienced them ourselves.

The book is structured in a way that it explores five different scenarios in light of the games we play in love. From Come On In to House Of Cards, this book sheds light on how our unconscious interacts with others as a result of the lessons we have learned from the emotional bonds we formed at the earliest stage in our lives, or from our experience with former relationships. 

I found Such Is Love to be a stirring and penetrating read that is very  knowledgeable and accessible to all readers, but particularly those of us who have been romantically involved in some way. What makes this read engaging is its easy-to-read interactability. I’ve always been fascinated by the human psyche and as such plunged headlong into the cryptic verbiage of Friedrich Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud during my college days, but this book is neither cryptic nor is it full of verbiage. It provides simply stated yet thought-provoking insight that is practical and for that reason I rate Such Is Love..

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Thank you for reading this review! Please share your comments and tell me what’s the last self-help or non-fiction book you read? Until next time! 📚