The Bi-ble Book Of Bisexuality

As a person from a religious background, my initial reaction to the title of this book was a mixture of intrigue and defiance. I was raised to be god-fearing, as most young Carribbean children are and the doctrinal principles of my formative years were centered around love and acceptance of one’s fellow man, but also taught that a queer lifestyle could not fully align itself with ‘godly standards,’ hence that initial feeling of defiance. But as a person who has also struggled with their own sexuality, in terms of defining it and coming to terms with it, I also felt a sense of intrigue.

I first came across this book through an Instagram Liveshow that was hosted by Jaz from Travels in Fiction and Sophie from The Little Contemporary Corner and it was a truly wonderful discussion that impelled me to procure the book and read it speedily afterwards. Incidentally, I finished it on National Coming Out Day on Sunday 11th of October.

The Bi-ble is a collection of essays written by an extremely diverse cast of bi/pan and queer individuals. Their narratives represent a wide variety of perspectives and personal experiences, but there was one thing all the narratives seemed to agree on; they all conveyed a shared feeling of isolation and erasure within the very community that they are meant to be a part of, namely the LGBTQ+ community.

Regardless of where each essayist sits on the bisexuality spectrum, be it a cisgender bisexual white woman or a non-binary bisexual or a pansexual black man, their experiences all reflect a larger issue of having one’s sexual identity diminished, marginalised or written off as just a stepping stone to being gay and therefore not valid. These individuals will be more likely to struggle with ‘coming out’ and feel more susceptible to some form of mental illness, a result of the alienation they feel.

I loved every single essay in this book and I especially appreciated the intersectional approach it took, expanding on the added forms of discrimination people face because of social factors other than sexuality i.e. race. Such chapters as Going Either Way by Chitra Ramaswamy and On Being Black And Bi-furious by Jayna Tavarez, carried a lot of weight with me personally.

It is precisely this feeling of alienation and self-doubt that has hindered me from being fully accepting of my sexual identity. I had many crushes at school from secondary school into Sixth Form and some of those crushes were girl crushes, yet I’ve always managed to perpetuate the idea that I am ‘mostly straight’ and not ‘fully bi’ as though adopting the former title enables me to hold onto some semblance of a heteronormative life. Because having the appearance of being heterosexual or ‘normal’ or ‘godly’ absolves a person from the condemnation, ridicule and judgement of those around them. In that sense, this book was quite a cathartic read for me.

The Bi-ble is an extensive, all-encompassing look at bisexuality, from intersectionality to mental health to bi history and pop-culture to bi and queer sex. It conveys a level of insight and intimacy that was deeply impactful, and gives a much needed platform to a stigmatised community, enabling them to voice the validity of their personal experience.


Where to find useful information and support about Bisexuality;

https://www.mind.org.uk/media-a/4688/stand-bi-me.pdf

https://www.stonewall.org.uk/sites/default/files/bisexual_people_workplace.pdf

http://bisexualindex.org.uk/index.php/Bisexuality


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These books will change your negative opinion of Non-Fiction

There once was a time, around the same time as my pretentious adolescent obsession with all things Gothic literature, when I only read fantasy novels. If it wasn’t affiliated with A Song Of Ice And Fire, Lord Of The Rings or The Lion, The Witch And The Wardrobe, the chances were I probably wouldn’t read it.

Of late though, I’ve learnt to appreciate the many benefits that come with reading non-fiction books. As it would turn out, not all books of this genre are gargantuan-sized political or historical verbiage, with cryptic equations and analyses and graphs. Actually, most of the non-fiction I’ve read are extremely accessible and are sure to disprove any negative misgivings people may have.

Of the modest pool of non-fiction books I’ve read, here are my top 5 recommendations that I hope will change your negative opinion of the genre, convincing you that books steeped in realism can be just as enjoyable as the feeling of escapism that books such as fantasy bring.

These picks will particularly appeal to people who are interested in topics such as health, beauty, politics and humour.

Please click on each title to read a review of the book. Unfortunately, reviews for Wellmania and We Should All Be Feminists are still yet to be published, but in the meantime, click on each of these titles to be taken to the goodreads page for each book, for a brief summary and more information.

Thanks for reading! x

FEATURED;

Such Is Love by Petra Hassall

Such Is Love is a self-help book written by London based psychotherapist and writer Petra Hassall. It was published in 2018 by Troubador Publishing. This book is a fantastic read for anyone interested in the human psche and how it plays out in our intimate relationships, however it is specifically geared at those who are looking for the key to finding a successful relationship.

Such Is Love is written in an accessible and structured way that is easy to connect with. It debunks psychoanalytical jargon such as Displacement Theory and Transactional Analysis and applies such terms practically to situations we can all identify with, if not having experienced them ourselves.

The book is structured in a way that it explores five different scenarios in light of the games we play in love. From Come On In to House Of Cards, this book sheds light on how our unconscious interacts with others as a result of the lessons we have learned from the emotional bonds we formed at the earliest stage in our lives, or from our experience with former relationships. 

I found Such Is Love to be a stirring and penetrating read that is very  knowledgeable and accessible to all readers, but particularly those of us who have been romantically involved in some way. What makes this read engaging is its easy-to-read interactability. I’ve always been fascinated by the human psyche and as such plunged headlong into the cryptic verbiage of Friedrich Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud during my college days, but this book is neither cryptic nor is it full of verbiage. It provides simply stated yet thought-provoking insight that is practical and for that reason I rate Such Is Love..

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Thank you for reading this review! Please share your comments and tell me what’s the last self-help or non-fiction book you read? Until next time! 📚